The Real Meaning of Christmas

With so much advertising and emphasis on presents, programs, and parties, take some time to teach your children about the real meaning of Christmas. It's so easy to get distracted by the celebration that one discussion or Christmas program isn't enough to help your children catch the meaning and significance of what Christmas is really all about. Here are some suggestions.

Have a daily or weekly reminder of the Christmas story. Use an advent calendar or read through the Christmas story in the next few weeks.

Tell children what the first Christmas was really like. Did you know that a manger is a cow's eating dish? How far is it from Nazareth to Bethlehem anyway? That would be like walking all the way from our home to _____. What was an Inn like? What were the shepherds doing out with the sheep at night? Did you know that the Bible doesn't say that there were three wise men? Maybe there were ten. Help children think about the story differently than they have before.

Write to a missionary family and find out how they are celebrating Christmas. Talk to your children about how cultures have different traditions but the real meaning of Christmas is the same.

And talk about God's gift of salvation. Why did God start Christmas in the first place? How does his gift change who we are? Keep in mind that this may be time that your child dedicates himself or herself to the Lord in a new and special way.

Christmas is a special time where memories are created that last a lifetime. Take some time to plan your Christmas season carefully to make sure the things you do and say have lasting value.

What have you done with your kids to emphasize the real meaning of Christmas.
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Milan Tomic

Hi. I’m Designer of Blog Magic. I’m CEO/Founder of ThemeXpose. I’m Creative Art Director, Web Designer, UI/UX Designer, Interaction Designer, Industrial Designer, Web Developer, Business Enthusiast, StartUp Enthusiast, Speaker, Writer and Photographer. Inspired to make things looks better.

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7 comments:

  1. We make an advent chain on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. On each paper link we write things we can do as a family (drink hot chocolate, play a game), ways we can touch peoples lives (call someone, bake cookies), expressions of our love for others (give coins in a Salvation Army bucket)and God (set up the Nativity), etc. Each day as we tear off the link, we do that particular idea. It builds our kids' anticipation for Christmas and keeps us focused on the true meaning.

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  2. We make a birthday cake and have a birthday party celebration for Jesus! Last year we bought dollar store gifts and wrapped them then went out for a family dinner. We asked our server to deliver these anonymous gifts to other children, with a note "Jesus is the reason for the season". None of the recipients ever knew who the gifts came from! Daily conversations about why we celebrate Christmas is key for the younger ones (it serves as a good reminder for the parents too!) Merry Christmas!!

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  3. When our two sons were younger, I had them memorize Luke 2:8-14. Whenever unsuspecting people asked them, "What do you want for Christmas?" they proceeded to recite the Christmas passage. It kept their focus on the real meaning of the holiday, and taught them to share God's Gift with others.
    On my blog, you can hear our son reciting that passage when he was four years old. He's now 29 yrs. old.
    Merry Christmas!

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  4. http://truthinthetinsel.com/
    This year my family is doing the advent activities from The Truth in Tinsel. It's a great way to incorporate daily scripture readings and crafts . My kids are loving it.

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  5. A couple of specific things we are doing: recapture some of the story behind established traditions, and then act on that tradition in the spirit of Christ behind it.

    For example, we celebrate St. Nicholas Day around mid-December. We read the story of Nicholas, watch the Veggie Tales movie tellinghis story, and spend time serving at a local ministry. This helps us use the momentum of the culture around us to both reclaim truth versus myth, and refocus on others versus our selves.

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  6. We are also using What God Wants for Christmas, but stretching it out over the entire advent season rather than the last seven days. Each Sunday of advent (then every couple of days the last week), our kids take turns opening the next "gift" to discover another character in the nativity story, until they open the last box to find a mirror, reminding them that God wants them for Christmas.

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  7. DiscipleLand.com has a great free download story that I found fruitful for discussing all aspects of Christmas and a biblical ground behind it. check out link: http://www.discipleblog.com/2011/12/teach-children-the-real-meaning-of-christmas/?utm_source=DiscipleLand+Newsletter&utm_campaign=01d9ede373-Dec+6%2C+2011&utm_medium=email

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