Developing Closeness

Parents must maintain a balance as they work with their kids. Firmness, confrontation, and correction in a child’s life are tools that God uses to address heart issues. You won’t get very far, however, by simply telling your children the right thing to do. Remember that a child can only take as much pressure as the relationship can withstand.

Those who apply force without relationship end up with angry and rebellious kids. Jesus was a great example of leaving behind the agenda to care for people and connect with their hearts. He rebuked Martha for her busyness and affirmed Mary for just sitting with him (Luke 10:38–42).

Many a tired parent asks, “Why do I want closeness with my child anyway?” Distance from children can even seem welcome sometimes. Some parents are frustrated with their role and eager for relief. One mom even believed distance was healthy said, “Aren’t teens supposed to hate their parents to prepare them for the upcoming separation and independence they need?”

This kind of attitude hinders a parent’s effectiveness. Teenagers may reject closeness with parents sometimes, but adolescence is when they need the relationship the most. New values, decisions, and difficult choices require wisdom that the teen doesn’t have yet. Young people need insight and guidance that parents can give them.

Emotionally connecting with your children isn’t just so you can all feel good. Connecting with your son or daughter emotionally softens hearts and prepares the way for much of the hard work of parenting, making it more effective and even enjoyable.

What are some ways you've been able to teach develop closeness in your family?
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Milan Tomic

Hi. I’m Designer of Blog Magic. I’m CEO/Founder of ThemeXpose. I’m Creative Art Director, Web Designer, UI/UX Designer, Interaction Designer, Industrial Designer, Web Developer, Business Enthusiast, StartUp Enthusiast, Speaker, Writer and Photographer. Inspired to make things looks better.

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2 comments:

  1. my daughter and i have been passing a journal back and forth lately - she is 11. we have found that it is fun, it helps to build respect for each other's time to be able to answer tough questions in writing and address issues when we are alert, etc. it is something only we share and decide when it is something we need to address face to face. as a bonus, we'll have something to treasure later in life as it is in writing. perhaps it will help her when she is parenting my grandchildren :)- i'll let you know.

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  2. I eagerly look forward to responses for this one. I have a soon-to-be 14 year old daughter that is lovely, obedient, and we have a decent relationship, its more like we are roommates than mother/daughter. She is very private, very independent, and I often hear 3rd hand about something she said or thought - I seldom hear these things myself, and when we do try to talk, she's a little defensive and short. We enjoy spending time together, we like each other, but it's like a wall between us such that the term "close" would never describe us. I'd really like to change that. I feel God calling me to "reach the heart" of my daughter this year, and I am seeking to know how, and what exactly that means. I definitely want "close."

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